Core-on-health

Jolly jumpers and infant development

Intro We’ve seen a lot of recent news aboutJolly Jumpers and the potential impact on infants’ lower limb development. We hope this is only the tip of the iceberg. We’ve also seen a lot of recent coverage about Jolly Jumpers being great for older children (and adults!), but we think that too is an oversimplification. The Jolly Jumper allows babies to develop their gross motor and body coordination skills. The harness keeps them from falling over when they run about. They strengthen their muscles and balance while they bounce. This innovative baby toy is designed to ensure that your child’s spine is correctly supported. It also ensures that they maintain an upright posture as they jump about, keeping them safe.  It’s true that a high proportion of those who start using Jolly Jumpers tend to grow out of them, but they do persist. They are certainly not unhelpful, they do…

Oxalates and their role in Fibromyalgia syndrome

Oxalates are nontoxic organic chemicals that may be found in certain foods, particularly vegetables and fruits. The formation of oxalic acid crystals in muscle and connective tissue cells is a possible cause of muscular pains and discomfort in people who suffer from Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). FMS can be a debilitating condition that affects many systems in the body. It differs from arthritis and autoimmune response in that the muscles are not inflamed on biopsy. However, the discomfort can be just as severe and FMS is frequently unresponsive to medication. Other symptoms of FMS include chronic fatigue, headaches/migraines, brain fog, yeast overgrowth, sleeplessness, and hormone imbalance. For many years, individuals with congenital hyperoxalosis have been advised low oxalate diets. People who suffer from this condition are prone to develop kidney stones and crystal arthritis. Oxalates can also cause other diseases, such as vulvodynia and vestibulitis (pain and inflammation in the vulvar region). So the…

Gluten Sensitivity and Female Hormones

Gluten sensitivity is a prevalent yet little-known cause of female hormone abnormalities that affects a large proportion of patients. Gliadin is the offender, which is present in certain gluten-containing grains and causes symptoms in gluten-intolerant individuals. The most difficult grains to digest are wheat, rye, barley, spelt, and kamut; but corn, rice, millet, and buckwheat are generally regarded as safe. There is some disagreement about whether or not oatmeal is safe. Gliadin, when ingested in gluten-free products, combines with an enzyme called transglutaminase to create an inflammatory, autoimmune reaction in the small intestine. Gluten sensitivity can lead to malabsorption. Gluten sensitivity destroys the villi on the lining of the small intestine, preventing adequate nutrient absorption and resulting in chronic nutritional deficiencies as well as uncomfortable intestinal symptoms including bloating, gas, diarrhea, and constipation, as well as other signs such as tiredness, sadness, moodiness, and anxiety. As well as radicular pain,…

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